Ambush - Target Blue: Officer Down - Baltimore Post-ExaminerBaltimore Post-Examiner

Ambush – Target Blue: Officer Down

Sunday was another tragic day for American law enforcement.

One police officer was killed and three other police officers were wounded in separate incidents in four cities.

San Antonio Police Detective, Benjamin Marconi, 50 was shot in an apparent ambush-style attack, while sitting inside his patrol car outside police headquarters. Marconi died at the scene.

ht-benjamin-marconi-jt-161120_v4x3_4x3_992Marconi was sitting in his patrol car writing a ticket, when another vehicle pulled up behind him, police said. A suspect exited the vehicle, walked up and shot Marconi in the head and then reached into the window and shot him again.

San Antonio police arrested Otis Tyrone McKane, 31, of San Antonio late Monday afternoon. Police Chief William McManus said he was arrested without incident.

A 46-year-old St. Louis, Missouri police sergeant was shot in the face twice by an assailant who pulled up alongside the officers’ police cruiser, opened fire then fled the scene. The suspect, a wanted felon was later killed by police after a shootout. The sergeant as of this writing is in critical but stable condition.

In Sanibel, Florida another officer was the victim of a drive-by shooting after he was shot in the shoulder while sitting inside his patrol vehicle after a routine traffic stop.

After a shootout with other officers, the suspect was taken into custody. The officer was treated for his injuries and has been released from the hospital.

san-antonio-police-departmentSunday evening another officer was shot in Gladstone, Missouri after a suspect produced a handgun, shots were fired and the suspect was killed. The officer was treated for his injuries and released.

Earlier this month, two Des Moines, Iowa-area police officers were fatally shot in separate ambush-style attacks while sitting in their patrol cars.

Just this past summer in what was the deadliest day for American law enforcement since Sept. 11, 2001 a lone gunman killed five officers in Dallas, Texas and ten days later another gunman killed three officers in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

So far this year fifty-eight law enforcement officers have been shot and killed, surpassing the total killed in 2015.

There will be no Happy Thanksgiving and no Merry Christmas this year for the families of the fallen officers.

There will be no protests in the streets, nobody will riot and no buildings will be burned down.

President Barack Obama, who usually wastes no time attacking the police before all the facts are in, has so far been mute on the killing of Detective Benjamin Marconi, as he is overseas trying to keep his failed legacy afloat.

The Black Lives Matter group, after a black man killed five officers in Baton Rouge, called for not judging all black people because of the actions of one man.

It appears that Black Lives Matter doesn’t follow their own advice.

When one bad cop does something horrible, they shouldn’t judge all police officers because of the wrongful actions of the few that do disgrace the badge.

Should we have judged all members of the Black Lives Matter movement when some protesters chanted, “What do we want, dead cops, when do we want it, now?”

Fact is white men kill police officers, black men kill police officers and black police officers have killed many black and white criminals.

It is 2016, not 1916 and many American law enforcement agencies federal, state and local are run by blacks.

So where is the institutional racism in law enforcement?

Some police officers of all races are racist. There is no denying that. Racist police officers need to be weeded out, however they are not reflective of the majority of law enforcement officers in this country.

Black Lives Matter and other groups have no problem tweeting and retweeting racist and anti-cop filth on their Twitter accounts, yet they are the first ones to scream racism when someone disagrees with their point of view.

I recently saw this post on the Black Lives Matter Twitter account; “Across the nation officers are trained to target people of color to a disproportionate extent; taught to view black and brown bodies as inherently more violent and staggeringly less human.”

I would really like to know what police academy or in-service training courses that police officers of all races attend, teaches any of that.

I guess all the police officers who have worked the inner cities of this country and have been killed or wounded protecting the citizens from the criminal scum who terrorize and prey upon their own people must have really believed that black and brown bodies were “staggeringly less human.”

No rational person can truly believe that the anti-police and anti-military movement that has been growing for some time in this country is not being funded by persons and groups both within this country and abroad whose only motivation is to sponsor acts of violence and discord in the United States and destroy our country from within.

Peaceful dissent and protests are just one of the many rights we enjoy as American citizens, however when a peaceful protest turns into a riot, with violence against police officers and the destruction of private property that is where the line has to be drawn.

Law enforcement means exactly that. Enforce the law and arrest the violators. Not hours later, but the minute it happens.

Shouldn’t the targeted killing of police officers be a hate crime?

Better yet, maybe Congress should think about making the killing of a police officer a federal crime punishable by a mandatory death sentence.

All lives matter and that includes the fifty-eight blue lives that have been killed so far this year protecting and serving the citizens of this country.

To all those who wore a badge and gave their lives in the performance of their duty, rest in peace brothers, your watch has ended.

 

 

 

 

 

 


About the author

Doug Poppa

Doug Poppa is a US Army Military Police Veteran, former law enforcement officer, criminal investigator and private sector security and investigations management professional with 40 years of experience. In 1986 Mr. Poppa was awarded “Criminal Investigator of the Year” by the Loudoun County Sheriff’s Office in Virginia for his undercover work in narcotics enforcement. He was also re-assigned to the Northern Virginia Regional Narcotics Enforcement Task Force for 18 months. In 1991 and again in 1992 Mr. Poppa’s testimony under oath in court led to the discovery that exculpatory evidence was withheld from the defense by the prosecutor and sheriff’s office officials during the 1988 trial of a man accused of attempted murder of his wife that led to his conviction. As a result of his testimony the man was ordered released from prison, given a new trial in 1992 and found not guilty. Mr. Poppa became the subject of local and national news media attention as a result of his testimony which led to the demise of his 12-year police career. After losing his job, at the request of the FBI, Mr. Poppa infiltrated in an undercover capacity a group of men who were plotting the kidnapping of a Dupont Chemical fortune heir and his wife in 1992. His stories have been featured on Inside Edition, A Current Affair, and CBS News’ Street Stories with Ed Bradley. Contact the author.
COMMENT POLICY

HOME / ABOUT / CONTACT / JOIN THE TEAM / TERMS OF SERVICE / PRIVACY POLICY / COMMENT POLICY