Aussies Irked by Sluggish Internet but Could be Overlooking its Promise - Baltimore Post-ExaminerBaltimore Post-Examiner

Aussies Irked by Sluggish Internet but Could be Overlooking its Promise

People who keep up with technology and the state of the Internet probably know that several countries have superior Internet service to Australia’s service.

At the moment, Australia’s average speed is 10.1 Mbps, which is definitely higher than the global Internet speed, which is 7 Mbps, but it trails behind several developed nations. South Korea averages 26.1 Mbps and Norway is 23.6 Mbps, which are the highest speeds throughout the developed world.

America’s Internet speed may not be as high as the aforementioned countries, but 17.2 Mbps is still higher than what Australians are working with, which has definitely irked many Aussies.

Why America’s Internet Stands Out

As mentioned earlier, the United States does provide respectable Internet speeds to the public, even if they are not the fastest speeds out there. Still, these speeds leave Australia in the dust, but there are many aspects of America’s Internet that are not as good as some may imagine.

One thing that should be pointed out is that most Americans are paying more for slower Internet speeds compared to other countries. This is a reality that most people in the US do not know, but it definitely hurts their population.

There are many reasons why Americans pay their Internet providers more; for one, most of their Internet options are controlled by only a few large companies. These near-monopolies control the prices and do not really compete with other companies to bring prices down. The lack of competition also makes it easy for these companies to provide subpar service without worrying about another company providing something better.

Another factor to consider in the United States is that a good chunk of the citizens lives in rural communities. Some of these people do not get Internet. As most people would say, the Internet has become a vital part of today’s society, and it helps drive the economy forward. A significant portion of the United States population is currently without convenient means of connecting to the Internet. This could mean the loss of opportunity, which is a real shame.

Sure, America’s internet may be better than Australia’s, but what the Australian government is trying to accomplish is something a little more grandiose.

How Australia is Making Up for Their Lack of Speed

Yes, Australia’s speeds may not be the highest compared to other developed nations, but what the country is trying to do should be taken into account.

The country along with NBN providers have been laying the groundwork to provide reliable Internet for the entire country, including rural areas. It is a large undertaking that is costing the country a lot, but some see this as an investment in Australia. Some predict significant economic growth once the entire country has reliable Internet in a few short years.

It seems that Australia is willing to invest in its people and sacrifice its speeds for a while to give everyone a chance.

It should be noted that more city people are becoming interested in local food from farms, but some of these farms are in rural areas where the Internet is not reliable. This means these farms cannot provide online services to customers or even accept payments that require an Internet connection, which hurts the local economy.

Of course, this is just one example of how a nation that ensures Internet access to all can help an individual.

Web speeds may actually improve once the entire groundwork is properly installed throughout the country.

In essence, the country’s Internet is still in BETA mode, which could explain why the speeds are not where they should be. No one is saying that Aussies do not have a legitimate reason to complain, but they may only have to worry about this problem for just a little longer, and the benefits seem to be worthwhile.


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